Spend five or 10 days in this earthy art and art supply making intensive, where you will make items from the landscape like paint, ink, paper, crayons and charcoal.  Learn how to make your own art materials directly from the living landscape and be an active and resourceful participant in your local ecology. Reclaim your innate creative potential as it is informed by the natural world.

You have the option to take either course in the series separately or truly deepen your knowledge and register for the complete 10 days.


Rewild Your Art: Making Paint & Ink from the Landscape (June 19-23, 2017)

Learn how to make your own paints, ink, and inkwells directly from the living landscape and be an active and resourceful participant in your local ecology. Reclaim your innate creative potential as it is informed by the natural world.

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Rewild Your Art: Making Paper, Charcoals, Crayons, and Sketchbooks from the Landscape (June 26-30, 2017)

Learn how to make your own art materials—paper, charcoals, crayons, and sketchbooks—directly from the living landscape and be an active and resourceful participant in your local ecology. Reclaim your innate creative potential as it is informed by the natural world.

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Faculty Bio: Faculty Bio:  Nick Neddo is a sixth-generation Vermonter who has been making art since he could first pick up a crayon. He grew up exploring the wetlands, forests, and fields of his bioregion and developed a profound curiosity, respect, and love for the community of life around him. As a youngster, Nick identified primary focuses that would become lifelong pursuits: study of the natural world, Stone Age technology (popularly known as primitive skills), and creating art. Everything changed for Nick when he started making his art materials directly from the landscape. The moment he begins working on a piece happens much earlier than that of the first pen line or brushstroke.  His artistic process includes days and weeks of searching the landscape, gathering raw materials, processing and refining the elemental components, and hand-crafting them into high quality tools and materials. Nick aspires to make tools that are as beautiful in their function and that retain as much of their raw form as possible.  He transforms fibers, furs, berries, beeswax, muds, sticks, and stones into pens, paintbrushes, crayons, charcoal, inks, paints, paper, inkwells, and sketchbooks. The subject matter of many of Nick’s compositions represents the creatures who provided the raw materials to make the medium in which they are depicted. For example, when using ink he made from black walnut trees, with a pen he made from a black walnut twig, Nick is compelled to make images of this tree. Nick’s uniquely landscape-based approach to making art is detailed in his recent book, The Organic Artist: Make Your Own Paint, Paper, Pigments, Prints and More from Nature (Quarry Books, 2015).



Filed Under: School of the New American Farmstead

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