Stories and Storytelling

People of Northern communities have relied on the telling and retelling of stories to transmit significant cultural understandings such as cosmology, ecology, spirituality and social norms. This course will examine the ways in which cultures of the North have used oral narratives throughout time and what functions such narratives serve today in the modern world. Traveling across the top of the world, we will become familiar with a variety of cultural groups who inhabit northern places and come to understand how geography has shaped both identity and the art of storytelling. We will read, listen, watch and share our own stories as we dive deeper into oral traditions. This course will culminate with an original production for the Sterling community.

College Teaching Experience: A Sense of Place

Entails serving as a teaching assistant in a course previously completed with a satisfactory grade. Introduces strategies for the planning, preparation, presentation, and evaluation required for teaching at the college level. Students work with the faculty member teaching the class to develop a detailed plan for participation in the teaching of the class prior to the beginning of the semester in which the course is offered. This course may be repeated once if serving as a teaching assistant in a different course.

Marine Natural History of the North Atlantic (Global Field Study)

This field-based course is an exploration of marine environments with emphasis on the North Atlantic. We begin with an introduction to oceanographic topics such as sea floor spreading, wave dynamics, ocean currents and tides, and general marine ecology. We progress to a survey of marine algae and invertebrate phyla, and culminate with a treatment of marine vertebrates with a focus on sea birds and marine mammals. This course combines lectures and discussions with intensive field activities such as sea kayaking, tidepooling, and offshore excursions.

Advanced Independent Study in Applied Science

Independent studies are available to students who have completed 45 credits. Advised by full-time faculty, these provide students the opportunity to pursue in more depth a focused topic not otherwise available in the curriculum. Independent studies may be proposed at the 200, 300, or 400 level for between 1 and 12 credits. Independent studies go through a rigorous approval process and must meet specific criteria in order to be approved. Proposals for independent studies of two or more credits must be approved the prior semester. Proposals for independent studies of one credit will be considered until the first day of an intensive session or the first week of a long-block session. For more details about the independent study proposal process, see the online submission form.

Please note that independent study is not available for topics already offered through classes.

College Teaching Experience

Entails serving as a teaching assistant in a course previously completed with a satisfactory grade. Introduces strategies for the planning, preparation, presentation, and evaluation required for teaching at the college level. Students work with the faculty member teaching the class to develop a detailed plan for participation in the teaching of the class prior to the beginning of the semester in which the course is offered. This course may be repeated once if serving as a teaching assistant in a different course.

Backcountry Skiing (ST)

This course is designed to equip aspiring backcountry skiers with the skills and information needed to safely travel through and understand the winter environment. The course starts on gentle rolling terrain where diagonal stride is introduced and practiced. A steady progression to hilly terrain necessitates technique for ascending and descending. Concurrent with instruction on skiing technique is an introduction to “winter” as an environmental condition in which snow cover and sub-freezing temperatures are defining elements and primary consideration in terms of comfort and safety. Formal avalanche training (AAA level 1 curriculum) will be a fundamental part of the course. Students will learn about the contribution of terrain, weather, snowpack and the human factor to avalanche hazards. They will also learn to evaluate potential risks and effectively initiate self-rescue. The teaching format involves both experiential and presentation based instruction. Outings are mostly day trips into the mountains from rustic cabin or yurt styled accommodations. One short snow camping experience is planned where students will learn to construct their own snow shelters. An array of other topics will be covered, including temperature regulation; winter survival; history of skiing; equipment design, care and repair; winter natural history; snow camping; cold stress and ailments; nutritional requirements; and practical weather forecasting.

Farrier Science: Introduction to Horse and Cattle Hoof Trimming

Students interested in using draft power on the farm or in the forest will be faced with a myriad of challenges. To keep draft animals operating at peak efficiency, they must have sound hooves. Typically, an owner relies upon the work of a farrier to maintain hoof health and integrity. With an in-depth study of hoof anatomy and physiology, the impact of nutrition on hoof wall growth and a survey of the biomechanical analysis of gait coupled with proper tool selection and use and actual practice on live hooves, students will become independent of outside specialists in terms of hoof care. Students will learn to recognize quality hoof care and discern the difference between speculation and sound farrier theory, use the Natural Balance Hoof Analysis and Balance Template to develop a trimming plan for each animal with which they work, select, maintain, and use the appropriate tools for hoof care, and, by the end of the course, be prepared to pass the apprentice-level written examination from the American Farriers Association.

Advanced Livestock Project

An upper level project under the supervision of a faculty member. A proposal must be submitted to and approved by the student’s project advisor prior to the start of the semester in which the project is to take place.

Advanced Garden Project

An upper level project under the supervision of a faculty member. A proposal must be submitted to and approved by the student’s project advisor prior to the start of the semester in which the project is to take place.

Advanced Independent Study in Applied Science

Independent studies are available to students who have completed 45 credits. Advised by full-time faculty, these provide students the opportunity to pursue in more depth a focused topic not otherwise available in the curriculum. Independent studies may be proposed at the 200, 300, or 400 level for between 1 and 12 credits. Independent studies go through a rigorous approval process and must meet specific criteria in order to be approved. Proposals for independent studies of two or more credits must be approved the prior semester. Proposals for independent studies of one credit will be considered until the first day of an intensive session or the first week of a long-block session. For more details about the independent study proposal process, see the online submission form.

Please note that independent study is not available for topics already offered through classes.

Mountain Expedition Skills Practicum (Global Field Study & Field Semester)

This field course builds on foundational outdoor skills and trains students in all aspects of wilderness trip design and implementation, as well as both front country and back country field camp skills and management. The program begins with a series of vehicle supported long-term basecamps in remote locations, where students learn field camp set up, functioning and management. Specific topics include kitchen set up and management, food planning and purchasing, cooking, living space set up and management, study resources and library management, tarp and tent systems and vehicle management and logistics. Additional topics include small group decision making models and group communication skills, and self-assessment using a situational leadership and learning model. The wilderness component occurs through immersion on a series of multi-week expeditions into mountain environments in California. We begin with logistics, including route selection and itinerary development, food planning, equipment selection and preparation, and establishment of group culture. As we move to the field, we learn, practice and hone skills such as minimum impact camping techniques, map reading and navigation, water location and procurement, backcountry medicine, establishing and maintaining high functioning field camps, equipment maintenance and repair, group communication and organization, and travel skills such as on-trail and cross- country backpacking.

Course Assistant for Expedition II

Students in this course will help to support faculty and students enrolled in Expedition II as they develop skills and group dynamics through the second half of the fall semester and during Winter Expedition.